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Jason W. LaPier is a multi-genre writer, delving into science fiction, speculative fiction, horror, slipstream, literary fiction, and surrealism. Originally from Upstate NY, Jason now lives in Portland, OR with his wife and their dachshund. By day, he is a software engineer at Elemental Technologies, where he creates the kinds of virtual worlds that actually do something. He is always in search of the perfect Italian sandwich.

1 Comments

  1. Great post, Jason. I would add that for whatever reason, dialogue is the most immersive form of narrative. You can stay in scene, describing what a character’s doing–look, Ma, no summary!–but for some reason, I find, it’s when characters are interacting through dialogue that we are most immersed in the dream of the story. (Le Guin points out that this is also where we are most emotionally involved.) Perhaps because we forget someone is telling it to us–perhaps because, as Cron’s book suggests, we’re super social animals, capable of picking up on a whole lot of information at once in our interactions with people, and so when characters start talking, a whole lot of machinery starts turning in our brains, the same way it would if we were involved in this act of communication.

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